Book Tour and Review: The Married Girls

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Costeloe_THE MARRIED GIRLS The Married Girls
(The Girl with No Name #2)
by Diney Costeloe

Historical Fiction/Women’s Fiction
Head of Zeus Publishing
Publication Date: February 17th, 2017
420 Pages

BRAND NEW FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE SISTERS OF ST. CROIX, THE THROWAWAY CHILDREN AND THE GIRL WITH NO NAME.

Wynsdown, 1949. In the small Somerset village of Wynsdown, Charlotte Shepherd is happily married to farmer Billy. She arrived from Germany on the Kindertransport as a child during the war and now feels settled in her adopted home.

Meanwhile, the squire’s fighter pilot son, Felix, has returned to the village with a fiancée in tow. Daphne is beautiful, charming… and harbouring secrets. After meeting during the war, Felix knows some of Daphne’s past, but she has worked hard to conceal that which could unravel her carefully built life.

For Charlotte, too, a dangerous past is coming back in the shape of fellow refugee, bad boy Harry Black. Forever bound by their childhoods, Charlotte will always care for him, but Harry’s return disrupts the village quiet and it’s not long before gossip spreads.

The war may have ended, but for these girls, trouble is only just beginning.

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Costeloe 1_bwAbout the Author:

Encouraged by my publisher father, I have been writing all my life. When I was five, he took my first effort to his office and brought it back in a cardboard cover with the label, ‘Tom’s Party’written by Diney, published by Daddy. I’ve never looked back and always have some writing on the go. To date I have written 10 romantic novels under the name of Diney Delancey (I liked the shape of the name and it sounded like a romantic novelist) and four novels as Diney Costeloe. All are also in large print and several recently published as e-books.

See my reviews on Amazon and on my website, http://www.dineycosteloe.co.uk or http://castlehavenbooks.co.uk


bookreview

3.75Penguins
Quick Reasons: this book and I did not agree much; beautiful, evocative, atmospheric writing; I felt transported into the time period; realistic, flawed, but redeemable characters; the two main women seem to foil each other, almost; the juxtaposition was clever and well-done

Huge thanks to Diney Costeloe, Head of Zeus Publishing, and Netgalley for sending me a free digital galley of this title in exchange for an honest review! This in no way altered my read of or opinions on this book.

Okay, penguins, this might make me a terrible person, but… this book and I didn’t get along very well at all. I think the biggest issue was, I couldn’t find any ounce of CARE for these characters. While Charlotte was likable and her devotion to her family and husband obvious, she didn’t much leap off the page at me for a majority of the read. And Daphne… Well, to be honest, Daphne rubbed me the wrong way from the get-go. I wasn’t fond of her AT ALL–though looking back on it, I’m sure that might have been part of the point.

These two women, the married girls this story revolves around…they were cleverly and beautifully written foils. In fact, I found myself musing over their complete opposite-ness throughout most of the read. Diney Costeloe did a wonderful job of penning the two in different, individualized personalities…while still keeping them somewhat redeemable. Despite this, I unfortunately, as a reader, could not connect with either of them–I could not celebrate their victories or mourn their losses as I was hoping to going into this read.

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Still, the historical fiction aspect was well-written and transporting. I felt I’d taken a trip back in time and landed in this neighborhood to watch the events unfold. And as much as I disagreed with the book, I found myself intrigued regardless. There were small moments with Charlotte–seeing her with her kids, watching her interact with her husband, the strength she had hiding deep beneath her skin that flared in moments of upset–that made me admire her. There’s something to be said about the strength of a woman able to keep her head high in the midst of a flurry of rumors, like Charlotte does. Watching her confront the woman behind the rumors? was both entertaining and awe-inspiring for me.

So while I wouldn’t probably pick up another book in this particular series, I did find the adventure to be thought-provoking and emotionally challenging at times. I wish I had been more able to connect with the characters; they were written as such wonderfully complex foils, I feel I might have missed out just a little on something magical. I would recommend this to lovers of historical fiction, flawed but redeemable characters, and the exploration of human nature. This book transported me to a different time; maybe you should turn off the modern world and let it do the same for you!

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